Sara V. Marder

Freedom through expression

pinkomondo:

Take note, Millenials:  This is what Baby Boomers were saying about Generation Xers 25 years ago.  They called us “slackers” (and still do), even though Gen Xers (born between 1965-1980) are more likely to have gone to college and have advanced degrees than the previous generation.
We were “overshadowed” by Baby Boomers simply because there were so many more of them and they got to the positions of power before us.   Not because we were lazy or “lost” or not educated enough.  

pinkomondo:

Take note, Millenials:  This is what Baby Boomers were saying about Generation Xers 25 years ago.  They called us “slackers” (and still do), even though Gen Xers (born between 1965-1980) are more likely to have gone to college and have advanced degrees than the previous generation.

We were “overshadowed” by Baby Boomers simply because there were so many more of them and they got to the positions of power before us.   Not because we were lazy or “lost” or not educated enough.  

iwasanawesomerkid:

You had an imagination. 

You were a dragon fighting astronaut sent from a distant planet to roast marshmallows. Schizophrenic? No, you were just talking to your imaginary friend who also happened to be a dinosaur. People do buckets of drugs in an attempt to reclaim the mental freedom of being a child. And, nobody judged you because it was just part of being a kid. 

Now you’ve got the imagination of a rock. Society has beaten the creativity out of you harder than when police use “reasonable” force. There isn’t enough acid in the world for you to see the world the way you did as a kid. Maybe we need to stop seeing this world as an adult and view it like we were a kid again. 




As an adult people would think you’re on acid if you did this. 

iwasanawesomerkid:

You had an imagination. 

You were a dragon fighting astronaut sent from a distant planet to roast marshmallows. Schizophrenic? No, you were just talking to your imaginary friend who also happened to be a dinosaur. People do buckets of drugs in an attempt to reclaim the mental freedom of being a child. And, nobody judged you because it was just part of being a kid. 

Now you’ve got the imagination of a rock. Society has beaten the creativity out of you harder than when police use “reasonable” force. There isn’t enough acid in the world for you to see the world the way you did as a kid. Maybe we need to stop seeing this world as an adult and view it like we were a kid again. 

As an adult people would think you’re on acid if you did this. 

“Imagination doesn’t just mean making things up. It means thinking things through, solving them, or hoping to do so, and being just distant enough to be able to laugh at things that are normally painful. Head teachers would call this escapism, but they would be entirely wrong. I would call fantasy the most serious, and the most useful, branch of writing there is. And this is why I don’t, and never would, write Real Books.”

– Diana Wynne Jones, “Why Don’t You Write Real Books?” (via ballerinaduck)

“You never love a book the way you love a book when you are ten. It is an honor to be in that sacred space in some children’s brains.”

– Daniel Handler (aka Lemony Snicket)

neurosciencestuff:

Kids’ earliest memories might be earlier than they think
The very earliest childhood memories might begin even earlier than anyone realized – including the rememberer, his or her parents and memory researchers.
Four- to 13-year-olds in upstate New York and Newfoundland, Canada, probed their memories when researchers asked: “You know, some kids can remember things that happened to them when they were very little. What is the first thing you can remember? How old were you at that time?” The researchers then returned a year or two later to ask again about earliest memories – and at what age the children were when the events occurred.
“The age estimates of earliest childhood memories are not as accurate as what has been generally assumed,” report Qi Wang of Cornell University and Carole Peterson of Memorial University of Newfoundland in the March 2014 online issue of Developmental Psychology. “Using children’s own age estimates as the reference, we found that memory dating shifted to later ages as time elapsed.”
Childhood amnesia refers to our inability to remember events from our first years of life. Until now, cognitive psychologists estimated the so-called childhood amnesia offset at 3.5 years – the average age of our very earliest memory, the authors noted in their report, “Your Earliest Memory May Be Earlier Than You Think: Prospective Studies of Children’s Dating of Earliest Childhood Memories.”
But the children who originally answered, for example, “I think I was 3 years old when my dog fell through the ice,” postdated that same earliest memory by as much as nine months when asked – in follow-up interviews a year or two years later – to recall again. In other words, as time went by, children thought the same memory event occurred at an older age than they had thought previously. And that finding prompts Wang and Peterson to question the 3.5-year offset for childhood amnesia.
“This can happen to adults’ earliest childhood memories, too,” says Wang, professor of human development and director of the Social Cognition Development Laboratory in Cornell’s College of Human Ecology. “We all remember some events from our childhood. When we try to reconstruct the time of these events, we may postdate them to be more recent than they actually were, as if we are looking at the events through a telescope. Although none of us can recall events on the day of our birth – childhood amnesia may end somewhat earlier than the generally accepted 3.5 years.”
Parents might help because they have more clues (e.g., where they lived, what their children looked like at the time of events) to put their children’s experiences along a timeline. When asked, for example, “How old was Evan when Poochie fell through the ice?” they erred less than Evan had. Still, they are not free from errors in their time estimates.
The only way to settle that, Wang and Peterson mused, would be to look for documented evidence – a parent’s diary, for instance, or a newspaper account of Poochie’s memorable rescue.

neurosciencestuff:

Kids’ earliest memories might be earlier than they think

The very earliest childhood memories might begin even earlier than anyone realized – including the rememberer, his or her parents and memory researchers.

Four- to 13-year-olds in upstate New York and Newfoundland, Canada, probed their memories when researchers asked: “You know, some kids can remember things that happened to them when they were very little. What is the first thing you can remember? How old were you at that time?” The researchers then returned a year or two later to ask again about earliest memories – and at what age the children were when the events occurred.

“The age estimates of earliest childhood memories are not as accurate as what has been generally assumed,” report Qi Wang of Cornell University and Carole Peterson of Memorial University of Newfoundland in the March 2014 online issue of Developmental Psychology. “Using children’s own age estimates as the reference, we found that memory dating shifted to later ages as time elapsed.”

Childhood amnesia refers to our inability to remember events from our first years of life. Until now, cognitive psychologists estimated the so-called childhood amnesia offset at 3.5 years – the average age of our very earliest memory, the authors noted in their report, “Your Earliest Memory May Be Earlier Than You Think: Prospective Studies of Children’s Dating of Earliest Childhood Memories.”

But the children who originally answered, for example, “I think I was 3 years old when my dog fell through the ice,” postdated that same earliest memory by as much as nine months when asked – in follow-up interviews a year or two years later – to recall again. In other words, as time went by, children thought the same memory event occurred at an older age than they had thought previously. And that finding prompts Wang and Peterson to question the 3.5-year offset for childhood amnesia.

“This can happen to adults’ earliest childhood memories, too,” says Wang, professor of human development and director of the Social Cognition Development Laboratory in Cornell’s College of Human Ecology. “We all remember some events from our childhood. When we try to reconstruct the time of these events, we may postdate them to be more recent than they actually were, as if we are looking at the events through a telescope. Although none of us can recall events on the day of our birth – childhood amnesia may end somewhat earlier than the generally accepted 3.5 years.”

Parents might help because they have more clues (e.g., where they lived, what their children looked like at the time of events) to put their children’s experiences along a timeline. When asked, for example, “How old was Evan when Poochie fell through the ice?” they erred less than Evan had. Still, they are not free from errors in their time estimates.

The only way to settle that, Wang and Peterson mused, would be to look for documented evidence – a parent’s diary, for instance, or a newspaper account of Poochie’s memorable rescue.